New Georges

Susan Bernfield, Artistic Director

Sarah Cameron Sunde, Managing Director

presents

ANNA BELLA EEMA

a ghost story for three bodies with three voices

By Lisa D'Amour

 

HERE Arts Center

145 Sixth Ave.

(212) 647-0202 or www.here.org

www.newgeorges.org

 

September 12 – October 4, 2003

 

Running in repertory with BELLY: THREE SHORTS (Sep. 6 – Oct. 4)

Directed by Katie Pearl

Music by Chris Sidorfsky

Sets Cameron Anderson

Lights Mark Barton

Costumes Olivia Wildz

Sound Greg Wildz

Press Representation JIM BALDASSARE

Starring

Monica Appleby, Gretchen Lee Krich, April Matthis

In a whirlwind narrative by Lisa D’Amour called ANNA BELLA EEMA, three actors tell an intriguing, beguiling tale of creation, womanhood, anima, loss and survival.

A most adult type of fairy tale ghost story, one set in a world where the local cop is actually Frankenstein post social services intervention, where a pile of mud can transform into a girl, and where the animal within us has a life of its own, ANNA BELLA EEMA blends story, song and imagination to impressive effect. On the surface, the tale is one of a reclusive mother and her 10-year-old daughter living in a trailer park that is doomed to destruction for the sake of a highway. The mother is odd, and does not go outside, but has introduced her daughter to books and unconventional thinking. All seems simple enough until the girl, Anna Bella, makes a girl, Anna Bella Eema, out of dirt.

Delivered with precision and humor by the three skilled performers, ANNA BELLA EEMA has a rhythm that adds charm to the production and wit to the words. As the story unwinds, and the family is threatened with eviction, Anna Bella goes on a magical journey with the wild things during the five days that her first period last. She returns, not so much a woman as a girl warrior, ready to defend house, home and mother, and to take on the world.

It is difficult to tell more without telling too much and muddling the intentions. ANNA BELLA EEMA, another impressive production by New Georges, is one of those plays that has to be seen to be understood. It is so much more than the words on the page.

- Kessa De Santis -

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