Rattlestick Playwrights Theater

presents

FIVE FLIGHTS

By ADAM BOCK

 

Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, www.rattlestick.org

January 13 – February 29, 2004

 

Directed by KENT NICHOLSON

Sets JAMES FAERRON

Costumes ALEJO VIETTI

Lighting DAVID SZLASA

Sound DREW YERYS

Choreography JULIA ADAM

Production Stage Manager JANA LLYNN

Stage Manager MARCI GLOTZER

Press Representation OPR/ORIGLIO PUBLIC RELATIONS

 

Cast

Joanna P. Adler – Jane

Jason Butler Harner – Ed

Kevin Karrick – Andre

Matthew Montelongo – Tom

Alice Ripley – Olivia

Lisa Steindler – Adele

With Adam Bock’s comedy, FIVE FLIGHTS marking the second play to be mounted since Rattlestick Theater changed names to Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, it becomes even clearer that this company means serious business, and that translates into rewarding theater going for all of us.

The plot of FIVE FLIGHTS revolves around a decaying aviary, the three siblings who having inherited the structure must decide what to do with it, and the outside influences on this decision. If that sounds boring, under the masterful control of playwright Adam Bock, it is anything but. The action is narrated by one of the siblings, Ed, and we come to learn that while he would be happy for the property to crumble to the ground, his sister Adele and her best friend Olivia want the space for Olivia’s Church Of The Fifth Day, a religion centered around birds. For any action to be taken, two out of the three siblings must agree. Ed never voices an opinion, and Olivia speaks for Adele, but there is yet another point of view at play.

We only meet two of the three siblings onstage during FIVE FLIGHTS. In place of the third, Bobby, Bock brings in his wife, Jane, a spectacular creation played with punch and great comedic timing by Joanna P. Adler, to play nemesis to Olivia. Jane wants restoration, and her interactions with Alice Ripley’s fiery Olivia are pure delight. The remaining characters, Tom, a love interest for Ed, and Tom’s hockey teammate Andre, who becomes a devotee of the bird church, nicely fill out the cast by adding life outside the aviary to the character’s lives.

Solid, if not perfect, FIVE FLIGHTS has enough merit to forgive the flaws, limited to a strange change in pace toward the end of the play when things seem to become a bit drawn out and extraneous. Up until then, there is nary a complaint to be had. Every bit of the design, the lighting, sound, costumes and set, is simple, on point and functioning as an integral part of the larger whole.

I seldom laugh out loud, but I did so a lot during this FIVE FLIGHTS. Featuring a smart script and stellar cast, this production is solid. Recommended.

- Kessa De Santis -

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