In a performance made possible by the support of:

THE SEIYU, LTD

and

The Dance Department of Riseisha College for Community & Sports, Japan

 

Keiko Fujii Dance Company

of

Osaka, Japan

presents

THE TREE OF EGOS II

 

March 16, 2002, New York City

 

The acclaimed dance company appeared for one night at The Kaye Playhouse in Manhattan, with part of the proceeds designated for The United Way 9/11 Fund.  Fujiiís choreography, indeed her sense of culturally blended storytelling, introduced the audience to some recent, but more so to some timeless universal truths like rush hour, cell phones, material jealousy and literal penitence.

 

Choreography, Direction & Costume Design KEIKO FUJII

Lighting Design & Stage Management, NYC KATHY KAUFMANN

Sound Coordinator MASARA GOTO

Backdrop COBALT STUDIOS, NY

Photographer DEAN SENSUI

Graphic Design LUIS TENTIDO

Press Representatives AUDREY ROSS PUBLICITY & TADAO FUJIMATSU, TFC

 

DANCERS

Keiko Fujii, Tomonobu Adachi, Emiko Shimobayashi, Kumiko Yasuda

Yasuko Murakami, Akiko Maekawa, Sachiko Oku, Tomoko Kawashima

Yumi Monno, Seiko Harada, Yuki Kawamoto

Chikako Igarashi, Akiko Suyama, Ayuko Yamada

 

Director, choreographer, costume designer Fujii has magnificent senses of style, form and storytelling.  Moving her THE TREE OF EGOS II from the urban jungle to the relative solitude of the countryside, in a place that belies the tragedy to follow, Fujii is always true to the overall artistic vision.

 

In a work that starts with the humorous presentation of business people during rush hour, all of whom come to have cell phone conversations in the course of their travels, it was clear from the beginning that the show itself would be unique.  The tone changes quickly.  As the story enters the realm of the usually more mundane, vanity and pride lead to murder.  Fujii, as the main character, the unlikely criminal, seeks escape, and finds more danger.

 

The costumes are really fabulous, and marvelously varied with each segment of the program.  Offering such wonderful visual cues enhances the overall value of the production.  For, we never wonder where we are, or whom we are seeing.  The rural folk are sedate and even regal in their alternately casual or traditional Japanese clothing.  In the city, the ladies of the evening, of the nightclubs or of the streets are equally identifiable.  Finally, when we are led into a netherworld of reluctant repentance, the otherworldly creatures are clearly defined.

 

Very impressive, very theatrical, and thoroughly awash in the sea of storytelling, Keiko Fujii, as evidenced by THE TREE OF EGOS II, is a company to watch out for.

 

- Kessa De Santis -

 

Divine Dancers