KRANKENHAUS BLUES

Visible Theatre Presents
www.visibletheatre.org
KRANKENHAUS BLUES
By SAM FORMAN

Directed by DONNA MITCHELL
Featuring

CHRISTINE BRUNO BILL GREEN JOE SIMS

Stage Manager: EMILY ALEXANDER-WILMETH
Original Music Composed & Performed by HELEN YEE
Additional Music: HANNAH HENS-PIAZZA
Set/Costume Design: KIMI MAEDA
Light Design: PAUL A. JEPSON
Light Board Op: AARON BOKROS
Program Cover by MICHAEL HAERTLEIN

DOROTHY STREISIN THEATRE
Part of the Abingdon Theatre Arts Complex
312 West 36th Street (between 8th & 9th Avenues)
212-868-4444 or www.smarttix.com

October 5th – November 5th
Thursdays thru Saturdays at 8 PM; Sundays at 3 PM

In Sam Forman’s KRANKENHAUS BLUES you meet a bizarre cast of characters who may or may not be undergoing medical experiments conducted by doctors in a 1930’s Nazi asylum. Bruno (Bill Green), a down-and-out Jewish playwright, carries the ball in moving the action forward, but like the sometimes-humorous subtitles that only clarify minimally, his rants/interrogations are akin to a frantic romp through insanity (or sanity, based on your viewpoint). Joe Sims is Fritz, a gay circus clown, who serves as an alter-ego to Bruno, and Anka (Christine Bruno) is a disabled actress who obviously is the sexual interest/torment in Bruno’s life. The one clear thing is that these three characters are in dire straits during Hitler’s Nazi Germany.

With KRANKENHAUS BLUES you may as well go with the verbal flow. Sit back and enjoy the rambling through twisted minds; you’re in capable hands with the cast. And as Forman alternates between 1930 Germany and New York City today, he introduces the fascinating concept of the playwright and reality. With an underlying theme of loneliness, reality becomes fuzzy. Does the playwright in dire straits, as well as the modern-day one, split off into separate characters and try to tell his story? Does he by necessity destroy his pre-conceived concept of reality and abstract whatever circumstances he experiences or envisions? Is writing a play comparable to conducting sadistic medical experiments and genocide of the self? These are thought-provoking questions for sure. KRANKENHAUS BLUES leaves you with a big “Huh?” as an answer and plenty of fodder for further discussion.

- Laurie Lawson -

Archives    Listings