NOVEMBER

Jeffrey Richards, Jerry Frankel, Jam Theatricals
Bat-Barry Productions, Michael Cohl, Ergo Entertainment, Michael Filerman
Ronald Frankel, Barbara & Buddy Freitag, James Fuld Jr., Roy Furman
JK Productions, Harold Thau, Jamie deRoy/Ted Snowdon, Wendy Federman

Present

NATHAN LANE
LAURIE METCALF                 DYLAN BAKER

In

NOVEMBER
By DAVID MAMET
With
MICHAEL NICOLS and ETHAN PHILLIPS
Directed by JOE MANTELLO
Scenic Design: SCOTT PASK
Costume Design: LAURA BAUER
Lighting Design: PAUL GALLO
Casting: TELSEY+COMPANY
Production Stage Manager: JILL CORDLE
Technical Supervision: HUDSON THEATRICAL ASSOCIATES
General Management: RICHARDS/CLIMAN, INC.
Marketing Services: TMG THE MARKETING GROUP
Company Manager: BRUCE KLINGER

Barrymore Theatre
243 West 47th Street (between Broadway & Eighth Avenue)
(212) 239-6200 or www.telecharge.com
Opening Night: January 17, 2008


Absolutely hysterical! Those are the only words for David Mametís NOVEMBER. This political farce, and Iím not even sure you can call it a farce because too many improbable premises ring almost true, is set in the Oval Office, currently inhabited by President Charles Smith (Nathan Lane) on the eve of his quite-likely unsuccessful bid for a second term. In addition to dealing with polls that indicate he is well-hated by the American public, he also has the pardoning of two turkeys, an out-of-control Native American looking for a place to build his casino, and a speech writer (Laurie Metcalf) who demands to be married to her lesbian lover before another word will hit her paper on his crowded plate clamoring for his attention. To his credit, his capable assistant/lawyer (Dylan Baker) manages to keep up with the action.

Lane, as usual, turns in an amazingly high-energy performance. Metcalf and Baker hold their own with perfectly-timed responses and one liners. Ethan Phillips and Michael Nichols round out this superb cast.

In NOVEMBER the humor is bitingly witty, the execution of Mametís script is flawless, the direction of Joe Mantello is brisk and full of laugh-out-loud action, and the audience doesnít get a chance to take a break from pure out-and-out fun.

- Laurie Lawson -

 

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