SAINT LATRICE

Written and Directed by JULIANA FRANCIS

 

P.S. 122, 150 First Avenue at Ninth St., P.S. 122

August 30 through September 29, 2002

 

Choreography JOHANNA S. MEYER

Set Design MICHAEL CASSELLI

Lighting Design BEN KATO

Sound Design RAUL VINCENT ENRIQUEZ and JOHN ZALEWSKI

Stage Manager JUDSON KNIFFEN

 

Cast

LATRICE - Emily McDonnell

BOB - Kevin Hurley

STARS 1, 2 & 3 - Jesse Hawley, Beth Kurkjian & Lisa Quintela

S.H. - Marie Losier

 

With a combination of sexual perversity at a shopping mall and other-worldly grrrl power, Juliana Francisí SAINT LATRICE takes a sideways glance into a world of fetishes and pedophilia, where the ultimate victim is the offender.  Taking on the darkest of topics, the sexual awakening of a 13-year-old girl at the hands of a much older man, the hero here is ultimately that girl, Latrice, who kicks back, and stays strong.

 

Watching SAINT LATRICE, I am reminded of the particular artistic voice I first encountered in 1996, whilst attending Ms. Francisí inaugural work, GO GO GO.  Ms. Francis starred in and wrote that piece, and elements of it are still fresh in my mind.  Now in 2002, in her directorial debut, Juliana Francis is no less striking in point of view, but perhaps more stylistically polished.

 

Ms. Francis has a keen sense of the perverse amidst the mundane, and she draws out the former to transform the latter.  Her female characters are defiant and bold, but also damaged.  They are scarred, physically and emotionally, yet the universe they exist within allows them to exploit circumstance and thus allow humorous perspectives on very dark situations to emerge.  Here, Latrice looks to three sexy starlets for advice about life and men.  Never portrayed as a victim, but more the player in a bad relationship, this sexually exploited girl, inspired by her muses, saves the day when her paramour, Bob, goes too far.

 

SAINT LATRICE is a spirited, deadpan, and comedic exploration of gender politics set against the backdrop of the most generic, modern background.  Interesting, and subtly poignant, there is a strong point of view here, if only you look for it.

 

- Kessa De Santis -

 

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