ST. CRISPIN'S DAY
Rattlestick Productions
David Van Asselt, Artistic Director
presents
ST. CRISPIN'S DAY
By MATT PEPPER


Rattlestick Theatre
224 Waverly Place (bet. W. 11 & Perry Sts., W. of Seventh Ave. So.)
Tickets: (212) 868-4444 or www.smarttix.com

June 14 - July 20, 2003

Directed by SIMON HAMMERSTEIN
Sets MICHAEL V. MOORE
Costumes CHARLENE ALEXIS GROSS
Lighting PETER HOERBURGER
Fight Director DAVID HEUVELMAN
Stage Manager TERRY A. CIOFALO
Press Representation OPR/ORIGLIO PUBLIC RELATIONS

Cast
David Wilson Barnes - Lauren Berts - Lee Blair
Denis Butkus - Mayhill Fowler - Michael Gladis
Darren Goldstein - Richard Liccardo - Tommy Schrider


In ST. CRISPIN'S DAY, author Matt Pepper has taken one aspect of William 
Shakespeare's HENRY V and run with it, spinning the wheels of his own 
imagination until a brand new play was born.  The world that results, 
set in France on the eve of the Battle of Agincourt, and told from the 
point of view of the beleaguered British soldiers, hints at the sort of 
literary editing that might spring into the mind of a high school student 
being introduced to the Bard for the first time, and trying desperately 
to make the storyline interesting, and relatable.

So, and to that end, we find a quirky, grown up version of child-like war 
games, where the soldiers wrestle, knee each other's nether regions, wonder 
at whores, betray each other at whim and pillage where possible.  However, 
and in keeping with the general structure of Shakespeare, ST. CRISPIN'S DAY 
contains a series of characters who represent not only type, but philosophy. 
We meet one avid military man, one member of the clergy, a handful of 
bloodthirsty, mindless soldiers, two prostitutes, two thieves, one king, 
and one man with a plan to end the war.

While very different from HENRY V, this new comedy is set in the same dank, 
miserable setting that Shakespeare's soldiers encountered.  The main difference, 
aside from ST. CRISPIN'S DAY being very funny, is that Mr. Pepper has taken a 
short scene from one play and turned it into a 75 minute romp that evolves 
rather seamlessly despite a slim plot.  Paired with a simple but functional 
set, good costumes, fast-paced direction and some spirited acting, the play 
feels meatier than it really is.

One need not be familiar with Shakespeare's original to enjoy Pepper's 
adaptation.  ST. CRISPIN'S DAY stands on it's own comedic feet as respectable 
diversion.
- Kessa De Santis -


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